Revocation of Parole

Any violation of a condition of release may result in revocation of parole and a trip back to prison. Maryland law provides for two types of violations:

  • a technical violation that is not a crime (e.g., failure to attend a required meeting or failing to be employed); or
  • the commission of a new crime.

If a violation of the conditions of parole is alleged, MPC or DPSCS (if this power is delegated to the department in a particular case) must decide whether to issue a subpoena or a retake warrant for purposes of a parole revocation hearing.

Attorney for Revocation of Parole in Baltimore

If you need a criminal defense attorney to help you after a violation of probation or after a violation of the conditions are parole are alleged, then contact an experienced criminal defense attorney at James E. Crawford, Jr. & Associates.

With offices conveniently located in Baltimore and Catonsville, Maryland, the experienced criminal defense attorneys at James E. Crawford, Jr. & Associates serve clients throughout the city and county of Baltimore, and the surrounding areas including Catonsville, Bel Air, and Annapolis.

Our attorneys represent clients at hearings to reconsider parole. We help our clients seek judicial review of a decision to revoke parole in a circuit court within 30 days of receiving the commission’s written decision. Our attorneys also represent clients after an allegation of a violation of probation in Baltimore or the surrounding areas.


Policies for Parole Revocation Hearings in Baltimore, Maryland

A subpoena is requested from MPC if the parole agent believes that the offender is not a public safety threat and that the offender will not flee. Otherwise, a parole agent must request a retake warrant, which subjects the individual to arrest and submit a written report to the commission on the alleged violation. The decision on whether to issue a subpoena or warrant is within the sole discretion of MPC.

If MPC finds by a preponderance of the evidence that the individual has committed a violation, it may continue the individual on release, subject to any new conditions that it may impose, or revoke parole.

If parole is revoked, the commission may order the violator to serve the remainder of the original term of incarceration. MPC may also set a date for a hearing to reconsider parole. The violator may seek judicial review of a decision to revoke parole in a circuit court within 30 days of receiving the commission’s written decision. The circuit court decides the case on the record made before MPC.

Parole violators arrested on a Maryland Parole Commission retake warrant who are not the subject of other warrants or charges are to be transported directly to the Maryland Reception Diagnostic and Classification Center located at 550 E. Madison St. in Baltimore, Maryland.


Supervision after Release on Parole in Maryland

An inmate released on parole, supervised probation, or under mandatory supervision is assigned to a community supervision agent within DPP.

Based on an assessment of an offender’s risk to the community and other factors, which is updated periodically, an offender is actively supervised at one of four levels of supervision: high, moderate, low-moderate, and low. Additionally, based on specific risk assessment factors, certain offenders are supervised within the containment supervision model for sexual offenders and the Violence Prevention Initiative containment model of intensive supervision.

An offender is required to pay a monthly supervision fee of $50 to DPSCS unless exempted by the sentencing court or MPC. DPSCS and the local detention center must notify an individual orally and in writing about how to apply for an exemption from the supervision fee and the criteria used in determining whether to grant an exemption.

An offender is required to pay a monthly supervision fee of $50 to DPSCS unless exempted by the sentencing court or MPC. DPSCS and the local detention center must notify an individual orally and in writing about how to apply for an exemption from the supervision fee and the criteria used in determining whether to grant an exemption.

Chapters 554 and 555 of 2011 created the Swift and Certain Sanctions Pilot Program, under which DPSCS was required to develop, by October 1, 2012, a pilot program in two counties that creates a system of graduated administrative sanctions for violations of conditions of parole by releases from the department.

Beginning in 2013, by October 1 of each year, the department must report to the General Assembly on the status of the pilot program, the percentage of departmental programs that use evidence-based practices, and the number of individuals incarcerated for technical violations and new offenses while on parole. Under Chapter 182 of 2014, the program is scheduled to terminate on September 30, 2017. Chapter 182 also expanded the program to include Baltimore City and individuals under mandatory release.

DPSCS is authorized to issue a certificate of completion to an individual supervised by the department under conditions of parole, probation, or mandatory supervision on or after July 1, 2014, so long as the individual (1) has completed all special and general conditions, including payment of all required restitution, fines, fees, and other payment obligations and (2) is no longer under the jurisdiction of the department.