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Maryland Criminal Defense Blog

Do Felons Deserve the Right to Vote in Maryland?

  • 25
  • July
    2014

Felons typically do not have a right to vote. In fact, it's estimated that 5.85 million people have been barred from voting in elections, according to FelonVoting.org. This is due to a process called disenfranchisement. Not all states are the same, with Vermont and Maine allowing people with felony convictions to vote while they're in prison.

There are at least nine other states that permanently ban certain kinds of felons from voting. It's argued, of course, that once the people have paid their dues, they should have their voting rights reestablished. Otherwise, it could be seen as unfair and undemocratic.

Robbery linked to Maryland man nearly a decade later

  • 18
  • July
    2014

Have you been charged with a crime like robbery? Maybe you are facing a charge for assault or a form of violence. You have a right to speak your mind and to tell your story to those who need to hear it. You shouldn't have to face unjust penalties or charges, and with some legal help, you may be able to protect your reputation, too.

Burglary may be charged as a felony or misdemeanor, but it's more likely to be a felony when it involves violence. In this case, the man being charged could potentially face different levels of charges, although it's not clear which charges he'll have filed against him yet or to what degree. The man from Maryland has allegedly been DNA linked to a robbery that took place in 2005.

Maryland makes revenge porn a crime

  • 18
  • July
    2014

Maryland residents should be aware of a new law that will take effect Oct. 1. This year, the legislature passed a law making so-called “revenge porn” a crime. This has been an issue for adults and teenagers alike and usually occurs upon the end of a relationship. One of the parties posts sexually revealing pictures or videos online intending to harm his or her former partner.

Beginning this fall, those convicted of revenge porn could wind up in prison for up to two years and pay a $500 fine. One of the co-sponsors of the new law, a Republican delegate from Frederick County with two teen daughters, had this to say about the ramifications of the new law, "It means that the ex-lover or boyfriend . . . can't use those pictures and other information to have revenge on someone who may have broken up with them or who may have walked away from the relationship."

Maryland boating accident injures 2 men who now face charges

  • 11
  • July
    2014

Here's an interesting story about two people who have been charged with a crime. They were injured while kayaking at a local reservoir, but are now facing misdemeanors for being somewhere they weren't supposed to be. They reportedly fell over 200 feet off the Prettyboy Reservoir in Baltimore County, and now they've been charged by the Baltimore Environmental Police despite the fact that they suffered injuries.

Entering a national forest or federally owned land with a "no trespassing" sign is a federal crime, despite the fact that it only results in misdemeanor charges. This reservoir, however, is owned by the City of Baltimore.

Felony for Maryland man leads to 30-year sentence

  • 25
  • June
    2014

Sometimes, things happen that can land you in hot water. You may be at the wrong place at the wrong time or have made a bad decision. If you're facing charges for burglary or other crimes, you may want to seek a defense to protect yourself in court.

The news reports that one man, a former employee of Amherst County Schools, has pleaded guilty to eight felony charges for child pornography and sexual offenses against three girls in Nelson County.

Maryland part of major traffic operation across 7 states

  • 20
  • June
    2014

When a person is charged with a misdemeanor crime, it may result in fines or short jail terms. It's important to know that as someone charged with a crime like underage drinking, you do have options to protect yourself. You and others in your position can benefit from a strong defense, and the people in this recent report may wish to have one ready.

A report from June 19 states that seven state police and highway patrol agencies worked together for three days during Operation Border to Border. It took place between June 13 and June 15, and it enforced traffic laws through around 791 miles of U.S. Route 15 and 124 miles of U.S. Route 17. The operation was set into place in order to help prevent traffic crashes from taking place along the corridor, which typically sees heavy traffic flow.

Baltimore man accused of violating protective order

  • 13
  • June
    2014

Personal disputes or disagreements can get out of hand quickly when tempers flare, and sometimes legal action results. For those defending against charges such as harassment or domestic violence, understanding how technology and social media can impact the defense is important.

A 31-year-old Baltimore resident has been charged with harassment by a course of conduct, harassment by electronic communication and violation of a protective order after he was arrested on June 1. According to reports, the man violated a temporary protective order that was granted on Feb. 5. The relationship between the man and the other party, reportedly a female, was not made known, and it was also unknown what originally sparked the petition for the protective order.

Maryland man arrested for bottle bombs

  • 06
  • June
    2014

Police have arrested a man who is accused of setting off "bottle bombs," a mixture of vinegar, baking soda and other substances in bottles, at three movie theaters. One of the alleged incidents took place in Maryland, while two others were in areas close by. According to reports, the 20-year-old man most recently placed one of the bottles in a Maryland movie theater on May 24. The theater was evacuated after the explosion.

The other incidents took place as early as the beginning of April, when the first of the bottles exploded in a theater in Alexandria, Virginia. Two other explosions took place in a multiplex on May 18, and a third incident took place at the same multiplex a week later.

FBI cracks down on computer crimes

  • 30
  • May
    2014

The Federal Bureau of Investigation focused on users of the Blackshades software in a recent crackdown that covered 17 countries, including the United States. The software has been used by hackers to commit Internet crime and gain remote access to webcams and hard drives. The bust -- the culmination of a two-year investigation -- was overseen by around 12 FBI cybercrime investigators in the FBI's special operations center in New York.

According to reports, more than 100 people were arrested, including the co-creator of the Blackshades malware, and countless computers were confiscated. Agents with the FBI were reportedly monitoring chat rooms and discussion boards frequented by hackers in an effort to keep tabs on the community's discussion during the operation, and the agency also took down a site that sold Blackshades.

Chris Brown admits to probation violation

  • 23
  • May
    2014

Parole or probation can be like a second chance for those convicted of crimes, but it is important to comply with all of the requirements to avoid additional jail time. Singer Chris Brown's legal troubles have been in the news for years, and Brown was recently ordered to serve a year in jail -- 131 days after being given credit for previous jail time and rehab -- after violating his probation.

The violation occurred when 25-year-old Brown was arrested for a misdemeanor assault charge while still on probation for the infamous 2009 incident involving then-girlfriend and fellow singer Rihanna. After the incident, Brown was ordered to attend family counseling and anger management sessions as well as submit to random drug testing and complete community service.