Violent Crimes

A violent confrontation can quickly change a person with no criminal record into a convicted felon. If you are accused of a crime that involves a weapon or violence, the best way to protect your future is to say nothing and contact an experienced defense attorney as soon as possible.

Alcohol or drug use may have played a part in the altercation and can sometimes have an effect on the criminal sentence. It is important that your attorney understands what can and cannot be used to diminish the potential sentence.


Crimes of Violence under Maryland’s Section 14-101(a)

Section 14-101(a) of the Criminal Law Article specifies offenses classified as crimes of violence. Sections 14-101(b) through (d) impose mandatory sentences for individuals who have prior convictions for these offenses and meet other specified criteria.

Section 14-101(a) defines a “crime of violence” as:

Crimes of Violence in Section 14-101(a) in Maryland Crimes of violence are specified in Section 14-101(a) of the Criminal Law Article. Sections 14-101(b) through (d) impose mandatory sentences for individuals who have prior convictions for these offenses and meet other specified criteria.

Individuals convicted of a crime of violence under § 14-101 of Maryland’s Criminal Law Article are eligible for various additional criminal penalties and earn diminution credits at a lower rate than other offenders.


Back to top

Mandatory Sentences for Certain Types of Violent Crimes in Maryland

Section 14-101 required that subsequent offenders meeting specified criteria be subject to specified mandatory sentences. For instance, a person must be sentenced to life without the possibility of parole if the person is convicted for the fourth time of a crime of violence and the person has served three separate terms of confinement in a correctional facility as a result of three separate convictions of any crime of violence.

A person must be sentenced to imprisonment for the term allowed by law, but no less than 25 years, if the person is convicted for the third time of a crime of violence and the person:

  1. has been convicted of a crime of violence on two prior separate occasions in which the second or succeeding crime is committed after there has been a charging document filed for the preceding occasion and for which the convictions do not arise from a single incident; and
  2. has served at least one term of confinement in a correctional facility as a result of a conviction of a crime of violence.

The court may not suspend all or part of the mandatory 25-year sentence. A person sentenced under these provisions is not eligible for parole except in accordance with the provisions pertaining to parole at the Patuxent Institution.

A person convicted for the second time of a crime of violence committed on or after October 1, 1994, must be sentenced to imprisonment for the term allowed by law, but not less than 10 years, if the person has been convicted on a prior occasion of a crime of violence, including a conviction for a crime committed before October 1, 1994, and served a term of confinement in a correctional facility for that conviction. The court may not suspend all or part of the mandatory 10-year sentence.

A person sentenced as a subsequent offender under § 14-101 of the Criminal Law Article may petition for and be granted parole if the person is at least 65 years old and has served at least 15 years of the sentence imposed.


Back to top

Finding Lawyers for Violent Crimes in Baltimore, MD

If you were charged with a violent crime in Baltimore or the surrounding areas in Maryland, then contact an experienced criminal defense attorney at James E. Crawford, Jr. & Associates. We provide a free initial consultation to discuss the pending charges against you, the potential penalties, and important defenses to fight the charges. Call 443-709-9999 today for a free and confidential consultation.