Teen gets decade in prison for sex crimes against toddler

A Maryland man has received a 10-year sentence for allegations related to a sex offense in May. The man, age 19, will serve the decade in prison for a second-degree sex offense, according to local officials. Experts in the case say that the severe punishment is largely attributable to the age of the victim.

Official reports show that the man entered a guilty plea for the second-degree sex offense, along with two other lesser charges and second-degree assault. All of those charges were merged into the first charge, according to news reports. The man was accused of assaulting a toddler at a party that was being hosted by family friends. Sadly, relatives say the little girl is still suffering the after-effects of the alleged assault; she is far less affectionate and is noticeably afraid of male physicians, for instance. The victim’s mother argues that the incident permanently changed her child.

Still, the woman says she hopes that the defendant might receive rehabilitative counseling during his incarceration. She said she believes the defendant is emotionally damaged because he, too, was a victim of child sexual abuse as a young boy. The defendant also expressed his desire to reform his ways. A judge in the case further explained his displeasure at the man’s actions, but he said that taking responsibility for the crime was the first step toward a brighter future.

Even though a 10-year prison sentence may seem like a long time, the defendant in this case will be eligible for parole after serving just five years. After he has served his time, though, the man will be required to register as a sex offender for the remainder of his natural life, according to Tier III offender requirements.

This defendant chose to plead guilty to the sex crimes charges, a laudable action according to the judge in the case. Guilty pleas are appropriate in some cases, but not all criminal defendants can benefit from this strategy. Criminal defendants should consult their qualified attorneys before making major decisions in their own sex crimes cases.